Home page > Le Temps des Médias > 13 - Télévision, la quête de l’indépendance > Hand on the Signal: Technical Change and Collective Identity in French Television, 1935-1995

13 - Télévision, la quête de l’indépendance

Send this article by mail title= Send Printable version of this article Print Augmenter taille police Diminuer taille police

Catherine Bertho Lavenir

Hand on the Signal: Technical Change and Collective Identity in French Television, 1935-1995

Le Temps des médias n°13, Hiver 2009-2010, p. 122-140.

This article examines five moments of the technological history of French television: the setting up of the airwave network in 1953, the choice of a line standard (441 lines, then 819, then 625), the choice of the Secam standard in the early 1960s, as color becomes the norm, the decision to launch a direct-broadcast satellite, TDF1, and the failure of the cable effort of the early 1980s. We see that these crucial choices are made within a complex national and international context forcing an artificial differentiation of technical norms. A parallel can be drawn between the major traits of society and the rationale behind those technical decisions. France, producer of ORTF programs and opting for the 819-lines or the Secam standards, is a different country from that which allows Berlusconi’s La Cinq and is unsuccessful in its cable plan. DrapeauFrancais

To quote this article : http://histoiredesmedias.com/Changement-technique-et-identite,1452.html